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longbeard

Mauser .22 Lr Single Shot

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hey guys, I have this old Mauser .22 Lr single shot rifle that was my Grandpa used to use in NRA competitions. I really don't know much about it as he died when I was very young. I was wondering if anyone could point somewhere so I could learn more about it. Apparantly its kinda rare because I haven't been able to find much. Thanks.

Edited by longbeard

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well longbeard, since we know I don't know much about a mauser and naturally will leave that to the experts. I started a little something for a cherry such as yourself. :b*k:

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Well thanks Dorsey. I appreciate it! I think.....err....what's a cherry exactly? LOL :lol:

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It's kinda hard to give you any info on your .22 Mauser without a bit of additional detail. A photo would be a good start, listing markings on the barrel & receiver would be a help if you don't have a pic to post. Is it a military-style rifle? Mauser (and others) made .22 training rifles that resemble the military Kar98. These rifles, if in good condition, command some pretty hefty prices from collectors.

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Well, your right, it is hard to identify without seeing it or knowing the marking on it. Which is why I asked for a place where I could do research instead of asking someone to identify it. But since you seem to know a lot about this type of thing I will list all the markings that I can from the gun.

Receiver Markings:

Mauser Werke A.G. Oberndorf G.(?)N.

187148

Barrel Markings:

Patrone .22 long Rifle 187148

There are a couple of little(VERY LITTLE) symbols stamped on the barrel and recievers but I can't really see them too well and certainly can't reproduce them on this keyboard.I really don't have a way of posting a picture, at least now at this time.

It is a single shot,the sights are completely adjustable in several ways. The ramp has yardage graduations marked from 30 yards to 200 yards.(I assume its yards, probably Km actually) And the whole sight assemble can be slid about half way down the barrel and is also marked, however I'm not clear on how to use these markings. As far as whether or not it is a military style rifle or not, I'm not sure what it takes to be a military style.

It really is a very nice gun and without a doubt the most accurate gun of any type that I have ever shot.

I was hoping to find a place where I could read up on guns of this type and learn as much about it as possible. As rare as it seems to be I really didn't expect anyone to know anything specific about it. But it seems you do,so thank you very much.

Edited by longbeard

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On a military style rifle, the forend wood will be nearly long enough to reach the muzzle, with a metal nosecap. If you've ever seen a military U.S. Springfield 1903 or a German Mauser Model 998, or a Russian Mosin/Nagant M91, you can readily compare their appearance to your .22 rifle. The commercial versions of the Mauser have a half stock, which leaves much of the barrel exposed.

Older .22 bolt-action single-shot Mausers include the following models:

EB300

EI320

DSM34 (a military lookalike training rifle)

EL320

EN310

ES340 & ES340B*

ES350 & ES350B*

KKW (another military-style trainer)

Except for the EB300 and EI320, your description pretty much fits any of the others.

*"B" models were improved versions of the regular ES340 and ES350, introduced in 1935.

The "Mauser Werke A.G." designation did not appear until May of 1922. Thus, your .22 was made between 1922 and 1944. Additionally, their first .22 single-shot rifle was introduced in 1923. So we've narrowed the time span to about 21 years.

Unfortunately, your barrel markings don't include a model designation. The serial number (matching on barrel and receiver ok> ) is no help. The tiny marks are probably proof marks. Does your rifle have a manual safety? How does it operate? This would narrow the possibilities a bit. Barrel length and weight of the rifle would also be clues to the specific model.

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The barrel length is 26 1/2 " and the overall weight of the rifle is approximatly 8 lb.'s The stock does NOT go nearly to the muzzle, it stops 14" before the end of barrel. The safety is a three position safety mounted on the rear end of the bolt. I've seen this type of safety on many mausers.

I also noticed another stamping on the right side of the barrel that I overlooked. it is: DRP DRGM. I appreciate your help.

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Yes Dorsey you were indeed correct! I'm enjoying the site, thanks for the heads up. Oh and one more thing. If you see Goober later on tell him I said "Duh-Huh", He'll know what you mean! Later.

Edited by longbeard

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WHOA! I just found a photo of the Model ES350B's rear sight! It's exactly as you described - sight is a tangent-type that slides on a dovetail on top of the barrel (to adjust for eye relief), and sight and barrel are marked. So, your rifle is a heavy target model (makes sense, since Grandpa shot NRA target matches with it), since these were the only types offered with this kind of sight.

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Sounds good, got a link to that picture I could see? When I was a kid I had a big shoe box which contained leterally hundreds of Irst place medals that he won in competitions in variour events all with that gun. All of those burned up in a house fire. Fortunatly the rifle was hanging on my other grandfathers gun rack at the time, otherwise it would be gone too.

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The barrel length is 26 1/2 " and the overall weight of the rifle is approximatly 8 lb.'s  The stock does NOT go nearly to the muzzle, it stops 14" before the end of barrel. The safety is a three position safety mounted on the rear end of the bolt. I've seen this type of safety on many mausers.

I also noticed another stamping on the right side of the barrel that I overlooked. it is: DRP DRGM. I appreciate your help.

The dimensions and safety indicate it's a Model ES340B or ES350B. Is the stock checkered (that is, are the pistol grip and forend carved with areas of tiny diamonds to prevent hands slipping on the stock...I apologise if you already knew this!)? If it's checkered, it's probably an ES350B...or a 340B somebody checkered! The 340B seems to have had a plain, smooth stock.

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Definately checkered! Grip and Forearm. A very nice job too, looks original. You seem to have a very good source of info!

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If you click the link belkow and scroll down to the last pic, number six, as best I can tell thats it. I think youve figured it out. I would need a lot better pics to know for sure.

http://www.acmeimportsintl.com/guns_001.htm

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Sources I referenced for this ES350B included "Mauser Bolt Rifles" by Ludwig Olson, "Gun Trader's Guide, 19th ed." & "Modern Gun Values, 10th ed."

BTW, rifle appears to be worth around $500 in very good to excellent condition.

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As far as the condition, it had a little surface rust on the barrel nearly 30 years ago when it was given to me, but it hasn't really gotten any worse. The stock has two marks on the left side that I just don't know about. In a way it looks as if they were put there intentionally, but I'm not sure. Could just be some sort of damage.

I'm pleased to hear its worth a few dollars, but to be honest, its worth far, far more than that to me. Its something that I'm really proud to own, not just because of what it is, but mostly because of what my grandfather was able to do with it. I wish I could learn more about that part of it, but the NRA doesn't keep records of things like that,(not back then anyway),and I can't get in touch with anyone from that side of my family. So,I got what I got.

I'd sure like to have those medals back!

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I know this is an old topic but is this the same rifle you're talking about?

This belongs to a co-worker and he's wanting to sell it but we don't know anything about it or what it's worth.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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I like the looks of the Mauser rifle in your photos. I'm a fan of the German 22 rifles; we have an old Walther single shot that has been in the family for many years. Is your's a single shot rifle or is it clip-fed? If it looks as good in person, I might be interested in it for somewhere up to about the $600 range if it's single shot. If it's clip-fed, I could go a little more. I'm sure I don't live too far from you, so let me know if you still have some interest in selling it. Thanks much, Sam

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I think its great that this thread is still on here, I had lost the model number, wound up searching for it here, and once again, Surbat helped me out.

Many thanks Sir.

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