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Invention: Auto-adjusting rifle scope

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Invention: Auto-adjusting rifle scope

An electronic rifle scope that automatically compensates for unsteady aim and recoil is being developed by US defence contractor Raytheon.

Using the sight, snipers and police marksmen would no longer need to manually adjust their sight to account for the slight sideways movement that occurs when they pull the trigger.

The digital sight uses a high-resolution digital camera to zoom in on a test target and superimposes a cross-hair in the centre of the image. When the marksman aims and fires, an accelerometer detects the small shock pulse created as the pin strikes the cartridge cap and starts the camera snapping. It captures a rapid series of digital images, which record the motion caused by the gun's recoil.

An image processor then compares the aim in the original picture with an image of the where the target was hit and electronically moves the cross-hair to compensate for any discrepancy. From then on, anything seen in the scope should, in theory, be a guaranteed bull's eye.

Patent Link

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What about when a professional sniper decides to actually use good control?

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I read about this today.

I'm dubious. Anything powered by electricity can (and if Murphy is to be believed will) go tits up at the worst possible moment.

Also, it appears to be a device that will automatically record the difference at the shot break and compensate for it. For those who might not know the shot break is the time and movement difference between when the hammer starts to fall and the round departing on its journey. Obviously a very small amount of time, but sometimes enough movement (if you shank the shot) to ensure a miss.

So it records this difference and offsets for it for the next shot. But who is to say that this shot break will be the same as your previous? You may have had a really crappy shot last time and the sight will over compensate for your good one this time and vice versa. You'll be chasing the sight all over the paper cause you will never have the same shot break every time...

The pro knows if he has suffered unacceptably high movement on the break and will either disregard that as a flyer or train to remove that break, like the professional he should be.

If he has a consistent break error that he can't train out of himself he adjusts the sight to correct for that anyway, which brings me back to this "new" invention that doesn't do anything new.

I'm spent.

Joe.

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I thought the sniper's goal was one shot one kill.

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I wanted to think this over before I wrote anything. My first reaction was...HUH???

Upon further reflection, my reaction was...DUH!!!! But now I think this device is just sorta' half-baked.

I've been expecting to see the release of an automatic sight sometime down the line. It would focus on the target (determine distance) and compensate for bullet drop automatically. Of course, scopes with bullet drop compensators can more-or-less do that now. With inputs for cross-wind, temperature, pressure, etc. an electronic scope could zero in for the first shot.

But that's not what this scope does.

This just compensates for movement of the rifle after the trigger is pulled, based on a previous shot at a special target. I see several problems with this. Main problem is the consistency of the shooter. If you don't pull the trigger the same way each time, even on a shooting rest, the resulting hit will change.

For field use, you would have to have your adversary set up or hold the special target for the first round, then wait around while you shot him. Hope the cross wind speed doesn't change between shots. no.gif

My thought is that if you are a sufficiently skilled shooter to use this device, you don't need it. Your trigger pull and other actions (like breath control) will be consistent. Your scope will already be zeroed in - which includes the compensation for your pull.

I suspect this is an intermediate patent to protect technology for the scope I expect to eventually see.

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Technology isn't a substitute for skill.

If you have no skill then your follow through won't be consistent and therefore any such device will only cloud the truth. If you do possess skill, then as CJ stated, you would be consistent and therefore any sight used would be adjusted to POI.

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on a total sidenote/offshoot........my sister worked at Raytheon...but not on this project...she worked on the next generation of radar for the navy (SPY I think)? They always invent insane tech there it seems.

Raytheon has produced tech used in other rifle scopes before this, good stuff too.

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I'm with Mars. I think this device is useless for any trained sharpshooter. The scope that adjusts for environmental variables would be quite valuable though. Of course, it would go "tits up" at the worst possible moment.

Jared

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Seems to me they're trying to remove human error, but being that we're human.... we seldom make the same mistake twice. I would think that the main purpose of this would be for general troop use. I say that half heartily, but on a turrent mounted weapon (SAW, M60) it might work. I would think that a sniper would retire himself before relying on artificial skill.

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That sounds like a solution looking for a problem to me. I’m pretty sure Russian WW2 snipers didn’t need all those batteries .. or had batteries at all.

Though, I like the idea of “digital camera” style optics, having the actual camera under the barrel or as close to it as you can while the view finder is some where else .. you could take it off, or simply tip it out of the way to use back up optics, iron sights, or what ever else you need, and it would be fully adjustable to every user.

Basically like a version of the “land warrior” system, or “IHADS”

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who knows, it might be useful to compensate for wind. At least you wouldnt have to re-adjust your sights all the time. but since the first shot must be fired for it to work it is rather limited (useless)

Find a way to compensate on that first shot and thats a different animal :)

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Me and some friends are working on a auto- compensating gun sight(this isn't a government project or fancy scientists that don't know what actual combat is like).

We've so far got a range finder hooked up to a eotech sight with some motors, still working out some kinks but its working for the most part

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Me and some friends are working on a auto- compensating gun sight(this isn't a government project or fancy scientists that don't know what actual combat is like).

We've so far got a range finder hooked up to a eotech sight with some motors, still working out some kinks but its working for the most part

To what end?  To adjust for distance?

 

Jared

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10 years later you reply to the same post.

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